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As a direct result of Hawaii’s robust vaccination rate, vaccinated travelers from the U.S. and its Territories can now bypass quarantine in Hawaii. Your vaccine record card must be uploaded to Safe Travels and more requirements for travel are found at HawaiiCOVID19.com/travel ... See MoreSee Less

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A re-post by request:
RESPECT OUR SEA TURTLES - It’s Nesting Season in Hawai‘i!

Summer is here and with it comes sea turtle nesting season! As a result, you may witness increased sea turtle activity, including mating in nearshore waters, as well as more basking (resting) on beaches. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, NOAA Fisheries, and the Hawai‘i Department of Land and Natural Resources reminds everyone — locals and visitors alike — to respect our sea turtles, at all times of the year.

World Sea Turtle Day, celebrated on June 16, is a day to honor and highlight the importance of sea turtles.

The two species that nest in the islands are the green sea turtle (honu in Hawaiian) and the hawksbill sea turtle (‘ea). The majority of Hawai‘i’s honu migrate to French Frigate Shoals — located in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands — to reproduce. However, an increasing number of honu are now nesting on beaches of the main Hawaiian Islands.

Primary ‘ea nesting beaches occur along the south Ka‘ū coast of Hawai‘i island, south Maui, and eastern Moloka‘i. Both species are protected under State and Federal laws.

If you see a honu or ‘ea on the beach or in the water, please remember:

View sea turtles from a distance of 10 feet (3 meters). In Hawai‘i, we view turtles respectfully. Give turtles space and don’t feed, chase, or touch them.Hawaiian honu bask on the beach. This is normal behavior. Don’t try to push them back into the water.

“It’s OK to help!” Fishermen, check your gear often, use barbless circle hooks and adhere to state gillnet rules. If safe for both you and the turtle, release accidentally caught turtles by following these steps:
o REEL-IN the turtle carefully,

o HOLD by its shell or flippers,

o CUT LINE as close to the hook as possible, and

o RELEASE with no (or as little) gear or line attached.

“No white light at night.” Use wildlife friendly lighting near the coast (yellow/amber and shielded lights). Don’t use flash photography, and keep lights and beach fires to a minimum from May to December, when turtles are nesting and hatchlings are emerging.

Avoid beach driving. Off-road vehicles crush nests, create tire ruts that trap hatchlings, and degrade habitats. Driving on the beach is also illegal in most areas.

Prevent debris and rubbish from entering the ocean. Participate in beach and reef cleanup activities.

Report all hawksbill sea turtle sightings, any nesting activity (turtle tracks or nest digging), and injured or dead turtles to NOAA’s Sea Turtle Stranding Hotline:O‘ahu/Lana‘i/Moloka‘i: (808) 725-5730; 286-4377 (after hours)
Kaua‘i: (808) 274-3344
Maui: (808) 286-2549 (primary) or 286-2899
Hawai‘i: (808) 286-4359 (Hilo); 881-4200 (N. Kona); 327-6226 (S. Kona)

Report illegal or suspicious activity that may result in turtle injury or death by calling the Division of Conservation and Resources Enforcement (DOCARE) at (808) 587-0077 or 643-DLNR.

An animal that appears to be sleeping on the beach may be a basking turtle and should be allowed to rest undisturbed. However, if you see an animal in distress — with visible signs of injury, bleeding, or entanglement in debris — or one that has not moved for more than two days, it may need assistance. Please call the NOAA Sea Turtle Stranding Hotline to report an animal in distress (numbers listed above). .

Fishermen are encouraged to follow suggestions of the Fishing Around Sea Turtles program. This multi-agency conservation program supports recreational nearshore fisheries by promoting barbless circle hooks and best-practice guidelines to assist hooked or entangled turtles. Trailing gear (fishing line) is the biggest threat and cause of injury or death to turtles. An external hook or mouth hooking is often not a major threat. If the hook is barbed, you may cause more damage by trying to remove it rather than leaving it in place. Fishermen can help in the continued recovery of Hawaiian sea turtles by following the guidelines of: REEL-IN, HOLD, CUT LINE, and RELEASE. For more tips to prevent or reduce the potential for interactions, search online for “Fishing Around Sea Turtles.”

Almost four decades ago, the sight of honu in nearshore Hawaiian waters would have been rare. Today, it’s common to see honu feeding, swimming, and basking in Hawai‘i. This increased visibility is the result of State and Federal protection, which banned honu harvest and reduced nesting beach disturbances, and community-based stewardship since the 1970s. The ‘ea population, unfortunately, hasn’t responded as positively as its cousins. However, hawksbills can be seen in some foraging habitats, especially in Maui.

Mature honu females nest about every 4 years, laying approximately four clutches (nests), with each clutch containing about 100 eggs. Adult honu can grow up to 4 feet in length and weigh up to 400 pounds. Mature ‘ea females will nest every 2 to 8+ years, laying approximately six clutches, each of which contains about 180 eggs. Adult ‘ea can have a shell length of up to 3 feet and weigh up to 250 pounds. Only 20 to 25 hawksbill females nest each year in Hawai‘i; in contrast, 500 to 800 Hawaiian green turtles nest annually.

Hatchlings typically emerge from their nest at night and find the ocean by crawling towards the brighter, open horizon. They ride ocean currents, feeding and growing for approximately 6 years, until they’re about 14 inches in length. At this age and size, they return to settle in the nearshore coral reef habitats of Hawai‘i. It’s in these reef habitats that turtles will feed and grow until they reach sexual maturity at 20 to 35 years of age. Turtles then undertake their first reproductive migration, returning to the same geographic location where they originally hatched, to nest and produce the next generation of sea turtles.
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What local Hawaiians REALLY think about tourists on Maui ... See MoreSee Less

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Update: Currently at Maui Airport, you will be asked to present your boarding passes to exit. So to expedite please do not discard and have your proof of travel ready and on hand. Mahalo.

Travel Changes:

As of today, you will no longer need a QR Code when traveling interisland and will be able to travel about freely within the State. Visitors to Hawaii may also travel freely between islands if they have been cleared to enter Hawaii with a negative Covid-19 test from a trusted partner and it has been uploaded into the Safe Travels Hawaii.

Residents that have been fully vaccinated in Hawaii with at least one shot (meaning Johnson and Johnson or 1 dose in Hawaii 1 dose out of state), will not need to provide a COVID-19 test. You will need to upload your vaccination card to Safe Travels Hawaii prior to returning.

Residents that have not been vaccinated 5 years and older will still need to provide a negative test 72 hours prior to travel or quarantine for 10 days.

Check www.hawaiicovid19.com for the latest updatests.
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What It Means to Malama Aina ... See MoreSee Less

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HALEAKALĀ SNOW: Road is CLOSED. It’s been snowing on and off most of the day. I’m being told by park officials that there were flurries but it didn’t start to stick until about 2pm. The road became icy and they had to close the road due to dangerous conditions at 3:30pm. Winter Weather Advisory extended to midnight. @kitv4

Image: Haleakalā National Park
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ROAD CONDITIONS AND FLOODING:

11:34 am: Water flowing out of the Mahi Pono fields onto Haleakala Highway by Firebreak Road.

11:05 am: Lono Avenue and Kamehameha Avenue in Kahului is flooded

11:04 am: W. Kauai Street and Lono Avenue in Kahului is flooded.

9:30 am: Haiku area is raining heavily and roads are flooding and running over Hana Highway. Road to Hana (front and back side should be avoided due to major flooding. Some areas are not passable.

8:52 am: Waiale Road in Wailuku (by the prison) is flooded.

8:51 am: MPD is closing the left turn lane on Haleakala Highway and Hana Highway.

8:51 am: MPD is closing Hansen Road from Hana Highway to Maui Veterans Highway.

8:42 am: Alamaha Street in Kahului is flooded.

8:16 am: Pu'unene Avenue and Wakea Avenue intersection flooded.

8:16 am: Road flooded at Black Sand Beach in Makena.

8:15 am: Makena Road at Polo Beach flooded and covered in mud - impassable..

8:15 am: Pole that ws struck by lightening in the res of Hansen Road.

8:00 am: Amala Road (by the old rent a car use lots) flooded.

7:30 am: Water running across Honoapi'ilani Highway by the Pali Tunnel. Water coming off the mountain. Rocks snd debris at MM10 Lahaina bound lane.
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Kula Highway Flooding at MM 20.5 in ʻUlupalakua ... See MoreSee Less

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THIS IS UPDATE FROM FEMA, please dont take these warnings lightly!!! Be responsible and be safe!!! ... See MoreSee Less

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Amazing Flash Flood on the Road to Hana - Maui, Hawaii ... See MoreSee Less

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PEOPLE GETTING SWEPT AWAY BY FLASH FLOOD IN MAUI, HAWAII | Apr 26, 2018 ... See MoreSee Less

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Tuesday Tips from your CRS Crew:

Many visitors like to visit ponds and waterfalls noted in travel books, but do your research make sure you are not trespassing on private property.

Looks are deceiving, a seemingly beautiful day, can instantly turn into a flash flood situation. Look at the mountains, if there are dark clouds, water may rapidly rise, without warning, you may get trapped or swept away.
Do not cross rising waters!

Don’t leave valuables in your rental car. If you see broken glass where you are parking, it is likely that a vehicle has been broken into.

Our ocean is beautiful but can be unpredictable.
Don’t turn your back and when in doubt, don’t go out.

Lastly remember even in paradise there is Covid-19.

Please help slow the spread, wear your mask, wash your hands and socially distance.

Be smart. Do your part.
Mahalo
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Why there are so many SHARKS.

Ho'o-ilo is the winter or rainy season. Winter begins when the Makali'i cluster begins to rise at sunset and set at dawn and is visible most of the night.

When the Kanaka Maoli saw the stars' appear in the night sky they knew it was the beginning of the most important holiday of the year. Makahiki.

Makahiki is the traditional Hawaiian celebration of the harvest and time of personal rest, spiritual and cultural renewal. A time for things to replenish. Start new.

All disputes and wars were ceased and there were festivities, competitions and contests between villages. Even strict Kapu (laws) were temporarily set aside to give more freedom. So everyone could rest and prepare for the next growing season.

Mid October, ancient Hawaiians didn't fish because Makahiki season is the spawning, birthing, and growing season in the ocean.

The increase in rain causes fresh water to run off into the ocean which attracts sharks. So it's not coincidence the increase in shark activity started at the beginning of Makahiki because that is how it has always been.

Is it possible that in their wisdom, the ancient Hawaiians stopped fishing during Makahiki for a reason? And the shark attacks are a reminder to return to honoring the traditions of Makahiki?

There are said to be those souls who still return from the past to remind us of those times.

Could the sharks be souls of the past sending us a message to slow down...and let things replenish?

Hawaiian Makahiki Blessing:

"As it has been through time, may this season of Makahiki be a time of new growth and rejuvenation for you physically, emotionally, intellectually, and spiritually"

c: I Love Kailua
(Painting: Herb Kawaianui Kani)
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Close Call ... See MoreSee Less

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