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ABC News
VIEW FROM ABOVE: A Hawaii resident captured this stunning drone footage of a humpback whale breach off the North Shore of Oahu. abcn.ws/2DakWPL
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THE MEANING OF "ALOHA": Aloha is the most Hawaiian word. In the Hawaiian language, it can mean hello or goodbye. It also means love and affection. The word aloha is used in a combination with other words, such as aloha kakahiaka, which means good morning; aloha auinala used as a greeting that means good afternoon; and aloha ahiahi is how you can wish good evening in Hawaiian. Because of aloha’s unique meaning and popularity, Hawaii is called the Aloha State.

Aloha is a Hawaiian symbol. Its meaning goes beyond any definition you can find about it in the dictionaries. In Hawaii, you hear aloha all the time and you are treated with aloha everywhere.

The Spirit of Aloha - The literal meaning of aloha is “the presence of breath” or “the breath of life.” It comes from “Alo,” meaning presence, front and face, and “ha,” meaning breath. Aloha is a way of living and treating each other with love and respect. Its deep meaning starts by teaching ourselves to love our own beings first and afterwards to spread the love to others.

According to the old kahunas (priests), being able to live the Spirit of Aloha was a way of reaching self-perfection and realization for our own body and soul. Aloha is sending and receiving a positive energy. Aloha is living in harmony. When you live the Spirit of Aloha, you create positive feelings and thoughts, which are never gone. They exist in space, multiply and spread over to others.
Inspired by the philosophy and the wisdom of the Spirit of Aloha, nowadays many institutions and businesses in Hawaii carry its name: Aloha Tower, Aloha Stadium and Aloha Airlines. Many Hawaiian singers write and perform songs about aloha as well.

The Spirit of Aloha as Law - Aloha Spirit is considered a state “law.” Although the word law sounds too strong and strict, Aloha Spirit is not such a type of law that will get you in trouble if you break it. Its main purpose is to serve as a reminder to government officials while they perform their duties to treat people with deep care and respect, just like their ancestors did. Aloha Spirit is more a lesson than a law. By learning and applying this lesson to real life, government officials can contribute to a better world, a world filled with aloha.

Definition of Aloha Spirit State Law - {§5-.5} "Aloha Spirit." (a) "Aloha Spirit" is the coordination of mind and heart within each person. It brings each person to the self. Each person must think and emote good feelings to others. In the contemplation and presence of the life force, "Aloha," the following unuhi laula loa may be used:
"Akahai," meaning kindness, to be expressed with tenderness;
"Lokahi," meaning unity, to be expressed with harmony;
"Oluolu," meaning agreeable, to be expressed with pleasantness;
"Haahaa," meaning humility, to be expressed with modesty;
"Ahonui," meaning patience, to be expressed with perseverance.
These are traits of character that express the charm, warmth and sincerity of Hawaii's people. It was the working philosophy of Native Hawaiians and was presented as a gift to the people of Hawaii.

"Aloha" is more than a word of greeting or farewell or a salutation.
"Aloha" means mutual regard and affection and extends warmth in caring with no obligation in return.
"Aloha" is the essence of relationships in which each person is important to every other person for collective existence.
"Aloha" means to hear what is not said, to see what cannot be seen and to know the unknowable.

(b) In exercising their power on behalf of the people and in fulfillment of their responsibilities, obligations and service to the people, the legislature, governor, lieutenant governor, executive officers of each department, the chief justice, associate justices, and judges of the appellate, circuit, and district courts may contemplate and reside with the life force and give consideration to the "Aloha Spirit." [L 1986, c 202, §1]

c: to-hawaii.co
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Tepui Tents: Setting Up in 5 Minutes!
Setting up any Tepui Tents is incredibly easy and quick!
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WAILEA FIRE: Update 9 p.m.
7:30 p.m. Jan. 6, 2019

Updates: mauinow.com/?p=291138

Crews are responding to a brush fire in Wailea. Initial reports indicate the Fire is located near the Maui Electric substation. We also have confirmed reports of a power outage in Wailea. Maui Electric crews are responding. We also have reports of area evacuations at the Hotel Wailea.

#MauiNowNews #Wailea

PC: Joann Caterina
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1 month ago

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Ok!!! We did it!!! We were the first ones sleeping in our “ONO” van..and I am ready to stop working and go on road trip.. for ever!!!!
We are sending “ONO” off today with first clients around the island of Maui ..wishing them fun ... and more fun... and more fuuuuuuuun!!!!!!
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new addition to our rental fleet,.. meet “ONO” van!!!!!
Thanks to our friends David Kaderabek for his hard work and and Petra Nerusilova - Javorek And Adam for the professional final touch!!! It wouldn’t be the same without you!!!!!
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World Surf League
Big Wave Tour Jaws Challenge
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World Surf League
The Big Wave Tour Jaws Challenge at Pe’ahi, Hawaii is on GREEN ALERT to run this Monday, November 26 at 7:30 am local time.

Watch LIVE on worldsurfleague.com, the free WSL app, and Facebook Live!
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HAWAII’S UNIQUE DIALECT: Perhaps more so than traveling to any other place in the US, you may come across words and phrases that you are probably not used to hearing. Many local residents commonly incorporate words into their speech from the Hawaiian language as well as from languages from other ethnic groups. This includes the Japanese, Filipinos, Chinese, Koreans and Portuguese, whose ancestors immigrated to Hawaii many generations ago. Below are some of the commonly used words in Hawaii.

Also, many local residents speak what is known today as Hawaii Creole, more commonly known as Pidgin English or simply Pidgin. Pidgin English started among plantation workers who first arrived in Hawaii during the 1800s. Virtually all of them did not speak English. Because they needed to communicate with their bosses as well as with their fellow workers, a form of English developed among the plantation workers. By the early 20th century, Pidgin English was the predominate language for most of Hawaii’s population.

Today, Pidgin English is still spoken today although not to the degree to which it was several generations ago. But it still exerts a strong influence in two ways. The first is how many local residents communicate among each other. And the second in the idiomatic phrases that are often used today in Hawaii. As a result, in 2015, the US Census Bureau listed Pidgin English as an official language of Hawaii.

To better help you understand what local residents are saying, here are some of the commonly used words that you might encounter during your next trip to Hawaii.

Sample of Commonly Used Words in Hawaii

a hui hou – until we meet again
akamai – smart
e komo mai – welcome
hale – house
haole – Caucasian
hapa – someone of mixed race or heritage
hapai – pregnant
kama’aina – long-time resident of Hawaii regardless of race
kane – man
kapu – keep out
keiki – child
kokua – help
kupuna – respected elder
lolo – crazy
lua – bathroom
makai – towards the ocean
malihini – newcomer
mauka – towards the mountains
no ka ‘oi – the best
ohana – family
ono – delicious
opala – garbage
opu – stomach
pau – finished
pau hana – finished with work
pilau – dirty
puka – hole
wahine – woman
wikiwiki – quick

Commonly Used Words in Hawaii – Pidgin and Phrases

boddah you – does it bother you
bolo head – bald
braddah – brother
brah – short from of braddah
broke da mouth – very delicious
bumbye – awhile
choke – a lot of something
da – the
da kine – the kind
dat – that
dirty lickins – a spanking or beaten badly
eh – don’t you know
faddah – father
fo real – really
fo shua – for sure
geev’ um – give it to them or go for it
grind – eat voraciously
hard rub – beaten badly
Hawaiian time – late
hemo – remove
ho brah – prelude to something amazing.
howzit – how is everything
I no kea – I don’t care
junk – not good
k’den – OK then
latters – good-bye
like beef – do you want to fight
mo’ bettah – the best
muddah – mother
no act – don’t exaggerate
onoliscious – very delicious
planny – plentiful
poho – a waste of time
slippahs – slippers
talk stink – speak badly about someone.
talk story – chat
tita – a tough woman
try move – please move out of the way
we go – let’s leave
you like – do you like it or would you like do something

Differences in Type of Words Used

Additionally, there are words that many in Hawaii won’t normally use compared to people on the mainland US. The below is a sampler of some of them. Understanding the meaning of commonly used words in Hawaii might offer insights into State’s unique culture.

Flip-Flops
People on the mainland call sandals made out of rubber flip-flops. But in Hawaii, people call them slippers. Plus in the minds of many people from Hawaii, calling slippers “flip-flops” is uncool. So if you want to be cool in Hawaii, perhaps you’d better call the rubber footwear on your feet slippers.

Garbage
Most people from Hawaii refer to discarded refuse as “rubbish,” not garbage as would be the case on the mainland US. This is also why people in Hawaii call a garbage can and a garbage man as a rubbish can and rubbish man. Most won’t be able to explain why the term rubbish is more commonly used in Hawaii than garbage. But that’s just how it is in the Aloha State.

Soy Sauce
Yes, sauce made from fermented soybeans is definitely called soy sauce. But in Hawaii, most residents call it “shoyu” which is the Japanese word for it. This is probably not surprising because a large segment of people from Hawaii are of Japanese ancestry. And for whatever reason, people just prefer using the Japanese word for soy sauce.

Kalua Pork
Whenever ordering that most iconic of Hawaiian food dishes, kalua pig, mainlanders usually order it as kalua pork. One can suppose that on the mainland, people might prefer to call that porcine mammal as pork rather than pig. Perhaps the thinking is that it invokes a more appetizing sounding image.

Sushi
Sushi is a type of Japanese cooked vinegar-marinated rice dish on which a number of other ingredients could be added to it. Such other ingredients could include raw or cooked seafood, seaweed, egg or vegetables. So please note that sushi is definitely not simply raw fish. Countless people from the mainland have erroneously called raw fish sushi, although less so than in the past. The correct term for raw fish is sashimi, which is the Japanese word for it.

Hawaiian Shirt
Using this word merits odd looks if you tell someone in Hawaii you’re looking to buy a Hawaiian shirt. They might think you are looking to buy a shirt for a person of Hawaiian heritage. None of which can ever be found because most, if not all, shirts in Hawaii are made for all ethnic groups. So if you’re looking for flower or Hawaiian theme printed shirts in the Aloha State, make sure you ask for “Aloha shirts.”

c: airtohawaii.com
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THE PLUMERIA: Plumerias are very similar to you and me. Their DNA can give us a record of their origin and their heritage. When it comes to these exotic tropical flowers, many associate Hawaii as their birth place due to the abundance of plants found on the islands. They where first found in the southern forest regions of Mexico in the mid 19th century. The very first plant was brought over to the Hawaiian islands in 1860 by Wilhelm Hillebrand, a German physician who became a botanist later in life.

One gorgeous little flower had all these meanings
throughout the different cultures:
●In India, the tropical plants were known as temple trees. Buddhists said they resembled immortality because you can snap a branch off and it will re-grow and produce beautiful flowers from the severed branch.
● Aztec Indians used it for medical purposes.
● Caribbean’s use the leaves as a wrap to heal bruises
● Hindus offered the beautiful tropical flowers to their gods.
● In other cultures, like Bengali, the white Plumerias were associated with funerals or death.
● In the Philippines or Indonesia, you may find these flowers in graveyard because of the belief that the tropical plant would shelter ghosts. In Hawaii, it is the symbol of eternal life.
● The flower is related with love in feng shui
● Polynesian women will wear the flower in their hair to represent relationship status.

One of the most important botanists in the 17th century was a French monk by the name of Charles Plumier. Plumier was sent by the king to the New World on several extensive journeys. On his travels, he was ordered to search for different types of exotic plants. During his field work, he was able to make descriptive notes and drawings of each plant that he came across. Using the collected information and plant cuttings, he was able to turn his notes into manuscripts. Even after all of the new species he collected, he never named any of them after himself. Due to all of his discoveries, Charles's colleagues named the plant after him.

Although he was honored with the naming of the plant, he was not the discoverer of the species. The actual discoverer of the plant was a Spanish priest named Francisco De Mendoza. Over a century before Plumier, Mendoza prepared a manuscript for the Spanish king, explaining the medicinal properties of local plants and how they were used by the Aztec population. Among the plants described in the manuscript was what would later be known as the Plumeria.

c: tropicalflowers&plants.com
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HUMPBACK WHALES ARE BACK IN HAWAII: To Hawaiians, the whale is a representation of the Hawaiian god, Kanaloa - the god of animals in the ocean.

Humpback whales (na kohola) are found in all oceans, although they generally prefer near shore and near-island habitats for both feeding and breeding. Since adult whales rarely feed in Hawaii, many of the behaviors are specific to mating.

A large percentage of the North Pacific humpback whales migrate to the main Hawaiian islands during the winter months - November through May - each year. The round-trip distance they travel during this annual migration is approximately 4,000 miles, one of the longest migration distances of any animal species. During their stay in Hawaii, they do not feed, but rely upon stored energy. Near the islands, the whales devote most of their time to mating and giving birth to their calves. While visiting the islands, kohola have become renowned for their various acrobatic displays.

Humpback whales are an endangered species. In the past, the global humpback whale population size was about 750,000 to 2 million animals. The current global population is about 30 to 40 thousand. With about 66% of the North Pacific population wintering in Hawaii each year, up to 10,000 humpback whales could come to Hawaii this winter.

BLOW (formerly known as "Spout"):
When a whale dives, air is compressed in its lungs. Upon reaching the surface, the air is exhaled through the whale's blowholes. The exhaled air expands, causing the temperature to decrease, thereby condensing into water vapor. The blow is quite visible and can reach heights of 20 feet. In concert with the blow is the sound of rushing air that can be heard up to 800 feet away. The blow of a humpback whale is unique to each animal and a great way to distinguish between types of whales. On average, adult humpback whales take a breath every ten to fifteen minutes, but can remain submerged for as long as forty-five minutes. Calves must rise to the surface every three to five minutes to breathe.

ROUND OUT OF PEDUNCLE ARCH:
When preparing for a deep dive, humpbacks will arch (hump) their back and raise their tail flukes above water. It is this pronounced arching of the back that has earned the humpback whale its common name.

PEC SLAP:
The humpback's pectoral fin is longer than that of all other species of whales, measuring one-third the whale's body length, or approximately twelve to fifteen feet. Humpbacks will often roll onto their side or back and slowly slap the water's surface with one fin or both fins simultaneously. The slapping of fins may serve as a communication signal to other whales.

HEAD RISE (aka Spyhop)
Some believe this behavior allows the humpback whale to get a better look at activity going on above the surface. A whale slowly rises vertically toward the surface, poking its head out of the water to below its eyes. Usually the whale is stationary and the flippers are outstretched beneath the surface. Occasionally whales will clear the water first with their flippers or tails, creating a circular window, from which they can more easily look through the surface of the water.

COMPETITIVE PODS:
Groups generally composed of males surrounding a female. The female frequently remains in the physical center of the group. The male closest to the female is termed the primary escort, and defends the position closest to her in the center of the group. Displays between males include visual displays (inflating ventral pleats, blowing bubbles), chases, and even physical strikes. Humpback whales in competitive pods may make sounds that are different from the long, complex, highly patterned and stereotyped “song.”

JAW CLAPJAW CLAP:
The whale opens and closes its jaws, clapping them together, at times audibly! This behavior is common in competitive or surface-active groups when males are competing for a female.

TAIL SLAP:
A tail slap consists of a whale raising its tail flukes out of water and slapping them forcefully on the surface of the water. When the flukes hit the water, a loud resonant noise can be heard for miles. Humpback whales are known to repeat this behavior over and over. This behavior may serve as a warning to others in the vicinity.

PEDUNCLE SLAP (or Lobtail):
An aggressive display where the humpback whale will thrash the surface of the water by whipping its upraised flukes from side to side. Humpbacks will slap the surface of the water as a warning signal to others or bash other whales during aggressive competition.

HEAD LUNGE:
The head lunge of the male whale is the equivalent of a dog baring its teeth at its opponent. The whale on the bottom is expelling water that it used to "puff up" its throat area and appear bigger.

HEAD SLAP:
Whale lunges or leaps partially out of the water, striking the underside of the chin forcefully on the surface of the water. Head slapping behavior often occurs after a breaching sequence and its meaning is unknown.

BREACH:
Everyone's favorite! A powerful acrobatic display where the humpback uses its tail to launch itself out of the water. With just a few pumps of its tail, the humpback can propel its entire body into the air, landing back onto the surface with a resounding splash. The purpose of this spectacular behavior is still unknown. Some serves as a form of communication, or maybe just a form of playful activity for the humpback.

WHALE SONGS:
Humpbacks have a range that covers eight octaves, from a bass so low that humans can’t hear it to a magnificent soprano. Their highly structured songs include multiple themes that are constantly repeated and even rhyme.

The songs last up to 30 minutes, and the whales embellish like jazz musicians, seeing who can improvise in some attractive way better than the other whale. Whales sing to one another over hundreds of miles and use their songs to navigate across oceans. Humpback whales travel thousands of miles as a group, singing to each other as they go. They can also communicate with each other over thousands of miles of ocean. Singing is part of their social system and community.

Aside from navigation and attracting mates, singing is also believed to establish a hierarchy among male humpbacks. Singing breaks out among migrating whales as they start to mix and continues not just in their breeding grounds, but to attract mates even during the feeding season.

c: SailHawaii.com
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KAMA PUA'A - The Pig Child: A long time ago on the Island of Oahu, lived a powerful king whose son was named Kama Pua'a. This child was difficult, to say the least. He was always chasing away his father's livestock and tearing up the royal taro patches. His father swore that if he ever caught him, he would kill him. To save himself, Kama Pua'a fled Oahu and moved to Maui and married Madame Pele, the fiery goddess. They were in love and soon had a son.

A sad event occurred; the son died. Madame Pele, as fiery as she was, went into a rage and started chasing Kama Pua'a. To escape, he started running down the slopes of Haleakala, towards the sea. When he did this, he turned into a giant hog. With Madame Pele gaining, Kama Pua'a called to his grandmother on Oahu, "Grandma, Grandma,what should I do?"

His grandmother answered his call, "Leap into the ocean and you shall save yourself." When he got to the bottom at Pa'uwela, he leaped into the ocean and changed into a fish. This ended his emotional experience with Madame Pele. Thus Pa'uwela, which means "calming of emotions", was named. The fish that Kama Pua'a turned into was a Humuhumunukunukuapua'a; a fish with a pig snout. And today,that fish is the Hawaiian state fish.

c: mauigateway.com
Folklore by Maui Cheetah
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THE HAWAIIAN NIGHT MARCHERS: In Hawaiian legend, Nightmarchers (huaka'i pō or "Spirit Ranks," 'oi'o) are the ghosts of ancient Hawaiian warriors. On the nights of Kane, Ku, Lono, or on the nights of Kanaloa they are said to come forth from their burial sites to march out to past battles or to other sacred places. They march at sunset and just before the sun rises. Anyone living near their path may hear chanting and marching, and must go inside to avoid notice. They might appear during the day if coming to escort a dying relative to the spirit world. Anyone looking upon or seen by the marchers will die unless a relative is within the marchers' ranks- some people maintain that if you lie face down on the ground they will not see you. This is to show respect. However, if exiting the area is the fastest option, it is recommended. Placing leaves of the ti around one's home is said to keep away all evil spirits, and will cause the huaka'i pō to avoid the area. Another thing is to always highly respect the night marchers which can result in great things.

The ceremony and conduct of the march is customised to the tastes of its honored leader. A chief known to be fond of music would be honored with much drumming and chanting. If the chief enjoyed peace and quiet, the march would be as silent as possible. If a chief did not like to walk around much, he would be carried in a sling. In old Hawaii, laws declared parts of a chief to be sacred, and not seen. The punishment for looking at these parts was death. If a chief's face was not supposed to be seen, he would lead. If his back was not to be looked upon, he would be in the back. However, for some chiefs, there was no part of them that was forbidden to look at. This chief would march among the other warriors in the group.

There are gods in some marches. The torches are said to burn brighter in these marches. The largest torches are carried at the front, back, with three within the group. The number five is key in Hawaiian mythology. In the march of gods, there are six gods, three male, three female. The Goddess named Hi`iaka-i-ka-poli-o-Pele, (commonly shortened to Hi'iaka), is often within the march. The marches are extremely varied.

"The first thing you will hear is drums in the distance, then you will smell a foul and musky odor, and you will hear a conch shell being blown, for fair warning to get out of the way, and you will see torches getting brighter and brighter as they get closer. Your best chance is to have an ancestor that recognizes you, they will call out,"Na'u!" which means mine. But if you are in the night marchers' bloodline no one in the procession can harm you. No matter what you build in their path they go straight through it. The night marchers are the vanguard for a sacred chief or chiefess who unusually have a high station in life." - Po Kane.

**Repost by popular demand
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... and by 2019 we will have them here..... just kidding!!;)

Aimal
This Autonomous Flying Car will be ready to take to the skies by 2018.
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MONK SEAL: Traffic is starting to slow down in the area of MM14 of Honoapi’ilani Hwy. (Kahului side of Olowalu Store) due to this seal being so close to the highway. Please drive with caution in the area. MPD is on scene.

NOAA and DLNR recommend, for your safety and the animals' protection, that everyone stay at least 150 feet from all marine mammals.
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POKE: Poke is a raw salad served as an appetizer in Hawaiian cuisine. Poke is the Hawaiian verb for "section" or "to slice or cut". Ahi poke is made with yellowfin tuna. Limu poke includes a type of seaweed.

Modern poke typically consists of cubed raw ʻahi (yellowfin tuna) marinated with sea salt, a small amount of soy sauce, inamona (roasted crushed candlenut), sesame oil, limu seaweed, and chopped chili pepper. Other variations of ingredients may include cured heʻe (octopus), other types of raw tuna, raw salmon and other kinds of sashimi, sliced or diced Maui onion, furikake, hot sauce (such as sambal olek), chopped ʻohiʻa (tomato), tobiko (flying fish roe), ogo or other types of seaweed, and garlic.

The selection of condiments has been heavily influenced by Japanese and other Asian cuisines.The traditional Hawaiian poke consists of meat that has been gutted, skinned, and deboned. It is sliced across the backbone as fillet, then served with traditional condiments such as sea salt, kukui nut (candlenut), seaweed, and limu.

During the 19th century, recently introduced foreign vegetables such as tomatoes and onions were included, and now Maui onions are a very common ingredient. The present form of poke became popular around the 1970's

What is your favorite type of poke?
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FIRST WHALE SIGHTING OF THE SEASON 10/08/2018: The Pacific Whale Foundation on Maui said it spotted its first humpback whale of the season this morning.

Capt. Aaron Bement of the Ocean Explorer spotted the whale at 8:08 a.m., about 2.4 miles north of Molokini heading toward Maalaea Harbor, the foundation said, and captured footage of the whale on video. The spotting occurred during a Molokini snorkel cruise.

“This is why we do this,” said Bement in a news release. “You never know what you’ll see on any given day. Once day, it’s the endangered false killer whales that our research team is studying, the next spinner dolphins, and today our first humpback whale sighting.”

Last year’s first whale sighting occurred at 4:44 p.m. Oct. 9 near Honolua Bay, foundation officials said. In previous years, the foundation’s first whale sightings occurred as early as Sept. 16 (2000) and as late as Nov. 11 (2005). Usually, the first sighting in the past decade has been in October, they said.

Thousands of humpback whales, which are protected by state and federal laws, migrate from northern feeding grounds to Hawaii every winter to mate, give birth and care for their young calves. In the past three seasons prior to this season, whale scientists and researchers have noted a decline in whale sightings, as well as sightings of mother-calf pairs.

c: staradvertiser
pc: Pacific Whale Foundation
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